Natcell-Logo_vial Natcell Frozen Thymus Glandular Extract Natcell Thymus Guide

Natcell Thymus Manufacturing Thymus Book Chapter More Natcell Thymus Info Thymus Clinical Studies

The Thymus Gland is a small gland in the upper chest. It weighs 1/3 - 1/2 half ounce at birth, and reaches its peak weight of about 17 ounces at puberty. Thereafter, under the influence of many factors, including adrenal and sex hormones, the active thymus gland cells begin to die off, with much of the thymus gland tissue being gradually replaced by fat and connective tissue.

Much of the healthy thymus gland structure typically atrophies by age 20, and the decline accelerates throughout life thereafter. As immunologist Keith Kelly notes: "The involution (shrinkage) of the thymus gland is one of the cardinal bio-markers of aging." In the past 40 years, science has discovered that the thymus gland is the key regulator of immunity.

Collectively, thymus gland hormones have been shown, in human, animal and in vitro studies, to have a broad range of action, well beyond merely maturing and differentiating T cells. These hormones can prevent the tissue wasting that occurs with thymus gland removal or severe thymus gland atrophy, and promote healthy weight gain in disease states- such as AIDS - where catabolic body wasting is typical. The thymus gland hormones can reduce autoimmune reactions, clinically and experimentally, such as occur in rheumatoid arthritis.

Thymus gland hormones also prevent the bone marrow injury and subsequent reduction in white and red blood cell production, frequently produced by X-ray or chemotherapy cancer treatment.

As cellular physiologist Dennis Fahy has noted:

If you restore immune function, your ability to make DNA, to have normal cell division, to have normal insulin sensitivity, to have normal thyroid levels and other things, such as normal population of certain molecules in the brain that change with age, all these things are restored by an improvement in the immune system.

Since thymus gland hormones are secreted by the very thymus gland cells that "shrivel up" and waste away due to aging, stress, disease, radiation and malnutrition, etc., the drop in thymus gland hormone activity with aging should hardly be surprising.

Although it is not well known, even to most alternative/ anti-aging medicine devotees, there is a large body of published, human clinical research supporting the use of oral thymus gland extracts. They have been used in a broad range of conditions, ranging from cancer treatment, to rheumatoid arthritis, to various allergy and asthma conditions, to recurrent respiratory infections and hepatitis. (11)

These studies have generally shown thymus gland extracts to be extremely non-toxic and side effect free, with few contraindications for use.

The main block to the acceptance of the efficacy of oral thymus gland extracts is the erroneous yet widespread belief that all proteins and peptides taken orally, as food or supplements, are 100% digested to individual amino acids before absorption, from the intestine into the body.

If this were true, then indeed orally administered thymus gland peptide hormone extracts would be broken down completely during digestion, becoming merely very expensive, low dose amino acid supplements, with no more immune activity than (for example) a few hundred milligrams of ground beef protein. Yet it has been known since the 1970's that significant quantities of various proteins, such as gliadin from wheat, milk casein, Ferritin, hemoglobin and milk immunoglobins routinely survive digestion and enter the body - and even the brain - intact.

The pioneering research of W.A. Hemmings and Ziovdrov and others had repeatedly demonstrated this by the late 1970's in a wide variety of experiments using many different proteins. (12, 33)

In the 1997 textbook Oxidology, Bradford and Allen even explain the mechanism of how this occurs. It is based on a cellular process called "pinocytosis." (44)

The thymus gland creates the T-4 "helper" white blood cells that perform their specialized job in the human body of locating invaders such as viruses, bacteria, or abnormal cells. The thymus gland also sends out the T-8 "killer" white blood cells to find invaders and destroy them.

Natcell Thymus Frozen Glandular Extract
Natcell Thymus Spray

People with advanced liver pathology will feel better after practicing the recommendations in this book. However, they may not completely reverse the path of the hepatitis C virus unless they incorporate the most aggressive treatment that delivers the best possible results: NatCellâ„¢ frozen thymus extract.

Enough cannot be said about live peptide thymus extract, which feeds the immune system what it needs to kill the hepatitis C virus. There are many forms of thymus: pills, liquid, natural, and artificial. These different products range from worthless to terrific.

I attribute most of the successful eradication of hepatitis C from my body as a direct result of consuming several thousand dollars of this product in eighteen months. Keep in mind that I had to pay as much as $600 a box to obtain thymus extract from doctors. I provide this same item for less than $140. I took one frozen vial every other day. I thawed it in my hand, poured one half vial under my tongue, and held it for five minutes, and repeat. If I could afford it, I would take it the rest of my life. If Cortez had found the fountain of youth, this could have been how he felt.

I advise against taking cheaper products. One example is Thymoic Protein A, a product listed in Health and Healing, March 1997 (15). I took this product post-healing, and I did not notice the jolt or feeling of well-being associated with the natural form. I question whether or not Thymic Protein A is effective, as it contains only one of the seven main properties of the thymus gland.

Be warned, some of these products will not dissolve in water, even after an entire month. These pass through you completely and into the toilet. If you have hepatitis C, you need NatCellâ„¢ thymus extract!

Thymic hormones and their downstream cell products (such as interleukins and interferons) control all of the phases of maturation, development, antigen commitment, proliferation and cytotoxic activity of the various T cells. Thymic hormones also stimulate non-specific phagocytic and cytotoxic cells to respond against foreign or "non-self" antigens.

Liver diseases, including chronic hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, have been successfully treated by natcell thymus extract. Results of a study using 102 patients with chronic hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis showed an increase in T lymphocytes, increased functional activity of mononuclear cells (increased chemotaxis and inhibition), and decreased immunoglobulin counts. All of these indicators signify an increased competence, which favors controlling the immunoinflammatory process in the liver and a normalization of the clinical manifestation of the disease leading to a favorable outcome. (16)

These results are important not only for successful treatment of a very difficult disease, which frequently has an unfavorable outcome, but also for the implications for treatment of hepatitis produced by other causes. Viruses, fungi, or mycobacteria (tuberculosis) cause many of the inflammatory conditions of the liver. (17) Cellular immunity is the chief defense against these agents. Successful treatment using NatCell Thymus extract suggests many exciting possibilities for treatment of the presently untreatable ailments of the liver using immunomodulating substances such as thymus extracts.

Importance of the Thymus in Immunity

The thymus is essential to the maturation of the immune system. It contributes to the development of T lymphocytes, guard cells that participate in the immunoreactions. Unfortunately, the thymus atrophies with age, and the production of defense cells gradually decline, making human beings more vulnerable to various diseases.

Thymus: An Essential Gland of the Immune System
The thymus is essential to the maturation and maintenance of the cells of the immune system. It exerts its influence by liberating hormonal factors that act inside the thymus itself as well as elsewhere in the body. Blood concentrations of these thymic factors reach their maximal value at puberty, and gradually decline afterwards. Immune system deficiencies observed in old people and in several diseases are linked in good part to the abnormally low level of thymic factors.

The immune system's function is to protect the body against parasitic infections (viruses, bacteria, fungi, microbes, etc.) that cause invasive and sometimes fatal diseases. The immune system uses, among other things, the lymphocytes. Many types of lymphocytes participate to the immune response (Figure 1). For example, during a parasitic infection, the lymphocytes called macrophages phagocytize the parasites and break them up into fragments which are then exposed at the surface of the said macrophage and presented to the immunoregulator T lymphocytes. Those T lymphocytes activate and release messenger substances (cytokines) that increase the immune response and stimulate the production of antibodies by B lymphocytes. Other types of T lymphocytes have a direct cytotoxic action on cells presenting parasite fragments, thus completing the immune response.

At birth, the child benefits from the lymphocytes passed on to him by his mother, which protect him from infections. He must quickly start to produce his own lymphocytes, which will mostly originate from bone marrow and thymus. A thymic deficiency in the newborn will result in lack of T lymphocytes and in the quick appearance of physiological complications that will translate into slowed growth rate or repetitive infections, and possibly lead to premature death.

Natcell Thymus molecular Response Diagram

Maturation of T Lymphocytes: An Important Event in the Immune Response
The maturation and proliferation of T lymphocytes are regulated by factors produced and released by the thymus and the lymphocytes themselves. A large number of distinct factors are necessary to maintain a balanced production between the various types of T lymphocytes; these factors include almost all interleukins, thymosins, thymopoietin, thymic humoral factor, thymic factor X, serum thymic factor, as well as other thymic factors not as well characterized. These serum factors have a direct effect on the maturation and differentiation of the various types of T lymphocytes.

The lymphocytes of the thymus are multipotential cells, which means they can undergo several differentiation pathways to ultimately become functional T lymphocytes (Figure 2). Those T lymphocytes include the effector (cytotoxic cells) and immuno-regulator (auxiliary cells, suppressive cells) lymphocytes. When a T lymphocyte is activated by a parasite, it commits itself and becomes specific to this parasite, which will thereafter be the only activator of this sensitized lymphocyte. The committed T lymphocyte stays vigilant for the rest of its life; its survival depends on the presence of thymic factors. In a way, the committed T lymphocytes constitute a major constituent of the immune memory, allowing the body to quickly react when exposed again to the parasite.

Thymus required T cell Factors

Involution of the Thymus During Aging and Sensitivity to Infections
The thymic gland is located at the base of the neck. In humans, it continues to develop after birth, and reaches its maximal size at puberty (approximately 60 g). Both lobes of the thymus are divided into lobules, which contain a cortex and a medulla. The cortex is composed almost essentially of lymphocytes, that are the actual defense cells, while the medulla is mostly made of epithelial cells with a few scattered lymphocytes. The epithelial cells of the thymus produce most of the thymic factors necessary for the maturation and maintenance of the immune cells.

During aging, the thymus gradually decreases in size and activity (Figure 3). Its weight decreases by 2/3 and its lymphocyte content by 90%. Cell death occurring in the tissue is not caused by the disappearance of any essential substance; in fact, this involutional phase is still not well understood, and it is believed to be a natural, genetically-programmed phenomenon.

The serum concentrations of thymic hormones also decrease after puberty and reach their lowest value at age 60 and on. This decrease clearly shows the deterioration of the immune system's competence observed in old people.

Thymus gland Aging Diagram

Conclusion: The thymus is an essential organ of the immune system. In the adult, its functions are to produce mature lymphocytes and to maintain the health of the surveillance lymphocytes that circulate in the body and stay alert in order to quickly defend the body against a parasitic intrusion. Thymic factor deficiencies caused by illness or aging are responsible for several immune system deficiencies; infections are then more difficult to fight, and they gradually drain the vital energy of the infected individual.


   

back to top   |   More Natcell Info   |   Where to Get Natcell Thymus

 
Thymosin a1 Thymic Humoral Factor More Natcell Thymus Info Immune Reconstitution
   *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

 

Advertisement
Please visit our sponsor Alternative Medicine Solution